SYMPOSIUM: Albert Murray @ Lincoln Center 6/17

A SYMPOSIUM
June 17, 2010 – 7 to 9 p.m.
Jazz at Lincoln Center – Agnes Varis and Karl Leichtman Studio at Frederick P. Rose Hall

Panel Discussion to Celebrate Publication of Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation

Jazz at Lincoln Center will be hosting a symposium on Albert Murray, the subject of the upcoming book Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation. This is the first book of scholarly and personal essays on the work of a writer who was instrumental in the founding of Jazz at Lincoln Center.

Born in Nokomis, Alabama, in 1916, and raised in Mobile, Albert Murray graduated from Tuskegee Institute (now University) in 1939. He later taught there and at many other colleges. He retired as a Major from the U.S. Air Force in 1962 and moved to New York City, where he resides with his wife, Mozelle, and his daughter, Michele. He is the author of many critically acclaimed books, including The Omni-Americans (essay collection, 1970), South to a Very Old Place (memoir, 1971), The Hero and the Blues (comparative critical essay, 1973), Train Whistle Guitar (highly acclaimed novel, 1974), Good Morning Blues: The Autobiography of Count Basie as told to Albert Murray (1986), and Trading Twelves: The Selected Letters of Albert Murray and Ralph Ellison (2000), among others. Murray is also the author of the hugely influential Stomping the Blues (1976), a history and aesthetics of jazz. Murray has served on the board of Jazz at Lincoln Center for many years. Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation is the first book of scholarly and personal essays on his work. (source)

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